Welcome to OPR
 

OPR Logo

                       Your Adoption Story
 Schnapps, now Sugar Bear                   

                   A Note from Sugar Bear

  Do you have a story and photo you would like to share about your  adopted pup or dog?  We're looking for some laughs, maybe some tears, how they have changed your life, how they have touched your heart.  We will post your photo on our home page and story to the Your Adoption Story page to share with all of our visitors.  Maybe, just maybe, you'll inspire someone to share their life with a homeless dog. Please send a photo and your story to: OhioPuppyRescue@aol.com  

                         

 Your Donations Help Support Our Community Projects

2013 was a year of great success and impact on the community through Ohio Puppy Rescue and Central Ohio Dog Rescue League efforts.   

*****Ohio Puppy Rescue Spay/Neuter Fund continues to focus primarily on our partnership with Pikes Friends, Pike Co. Humane Association, Shawnee Animal Hospital to provide free spay and neutering.  Our efforts have a "no questions asked" service to Pike and Scioto Counties for those who wish to have their dog altered.  The word has spread to several residents of these Counties who joined the efforts to stop unwanted dogs in their Counties.  In 2014, we will begin partnerships in Franklin County to provide free alters to pit bulls and black dogs, two of the types of the dogs euthanized at local shelters.

 *****We  request a "Pay It Forward" commitment from all who adopt a mill survivor.  This means that each person in the family promises to learn about puppy mills and tells at least one person about what they learned.

 *****We began a close relationship with Central Ohio Dog Rescue League and adopted the group as our sister organization under a DBA.  In 2013, we began joining talents and experiences to work with local organizations who focus on shutting down breeders who don't provide humane conditions and medical treatment to companion animals.   We also focused attention on rescuing pets no longer wanted by their families and dumped off at local shelters.

In order to continue our efforts in supporting our community, the rescue community, and the pet over population, additional funding is required. We need continuous and generous donations in order to sustain our life-changing work into 2014 and future years.  Please consider a donation to enable our work to continue.  Donations can be made by adopting one of our wonderful rescues, donate through your Community Giving programs at your workplace or directly by sending a monetary gift through
PayPal.  If you wish to send a check or money order, please contact us via email for details.

 

Kurt and Melissa

Puppy mill rescue, Kurt, and his Mom,  Melissa McCrady,
WTMJ-TV Anchor/Reporter

King Louie

Puppy mill rescue, King Louie, and his Mom,  

Jennifer Bates, NYCO Soprano



Donate to this organization through Drs. Foster and Smith
Drs. Foster and Smith: Dog Supplies - Cat Supplies - Pet Blog

 

Help Save Dogs From
Abandonment

Use the PetYourDog.com's dog matching
system
to find your compatible dog breeds
Ohio Puppy Rescue is a verified shelter of the petyourdog.com community and supports its awareness program

 


Pages of Interest
Bookmark and Share

 
Last Updated:
8/13/2014 3:29 AM

 

 
 Animal Poison Control
 
Top 10 Pet Poison
 
 
With various dangers lurking in corners and cabinets, the home can be a minefield of poisons for our pets. In 2009, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) in Urbana, IL, handled more than 140,000 cases of pets exposed to toxic substances, many of which included everyday household products. Don’t leave it up to Fido or Fluffy to keep themselves safe. Below is a list of the top ten pet poisons that affected our furry friends in 2009.

Human Medications
For several years, human medications have been number one on the ASPCA’s list of common hazards, and 2009 was no exception. Last year, the ASPCA managed more than 50,000 calls involving prescription and over-the-counter drugs, such as painkillers, cold medications, antidepressants and dietary supplements. Pets often snatch pill vials from counters and nightstands or gobble up medications accidentally dropped on the floor, so it’s essential to keep meds tucked away in hard-to-reach cabinets.

Insecticides
In our effort to battle home invasions of unwelcome pests, we often unwittingly put our pets at risk. In 2008, our toxicologists fielded more than 31,000 calls related to insecticides. One of the most common incidents involved the misuse of flea and tick products—such as applying the wrong topical treatment to the wrong species. Thus, it’s always important to talk to your pet’s veterinarian before beginning any flea and tick control program.

People Food
People food like grapes, raisins, avocado and certain citrus fruit can seriously harm our furry friends, and accounted for more than 13,500 cases in 2008. One of the worst offenders—chocolate—contains large amounts of methylxanthines, which, if ingested in significant amounts, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst, urination, hyperactivity, and in severe cases, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors and seizures.

Rodenticides
Last year, the ASPCA received approximately 8,000 calls about pets who had accidentally ingested rat and mouse poisons. Many baits used to attract rodents contain inactive ingredients that are attractive to pets as well. Depending on the type of rodenticide, ingestions can lead to potentially life-threatening problems for pets, including bleeding, seizures and kidney damage.

Veterinary Medications
Even though veterinary medications are intended for pets, they’re often misapplied or improperly dispensed by well-meaning pet parents. In 2008, the ASPCA managed nearly 8,000 cases involving animal-related preparations such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heartworm preventatives, de-wormers, antibiotics, vaccines and nutritional supplements.

Chemical Hazards
In 2008, the Animal Poison Control Center handled approximately 7,500 cases of pet exposure to chemical hazards. A category on the rise, chemical hazards—found in ethylene glycol antifreeze, paint thinner, drain cleaners and pool/spa chemicals—form a substantial danger to pets. Substances in this group can cause gastrointestinal upset, depression, respiratory difficulties and chemical burns.

Plants
Common houseplants were the subject of nearly 6,500 calls to the Animal Poison Control Center in 2008. Varieties such as azalea, rhododendron, sago palm, lilies, kalanchoe and schefflera are often found in homes and can be harmful to pets. Lilies are especially toxic to cats, and can cause life-threatening kidney failure even in small amounts.

Household Cleaners
Everybody knows that household cleaning supplies can be toxic to adults and children, but few take precautions to protect their pets from common agents such as bleaches, detergents and disinfectants. Last year, the ASPCA received more than 4,000 calls related to household cleaners. These products, when inhaled by our furry friends, can cause serious gastrointestinal distress and irritation to the respiratory tract.

Heavy Metals
It’s not too much loud music that constitutes our next pet poison offender. Instead, it’s heavy metals such as lead, zinc and mercury, which accounted for more than 3,000 cases of pet poisonings in 2008. Lead is especially pernicious, and pets are exposed to it through many sources, including consumer products, paint chips, linoleum, and lead dust produced when surfaces in older homes are scraped or sanded.

Fertilizer
It may keep your grass green, but certain types of fertilizer can cause problems for outdoor cats and dogs. Last year, the ASPCA fielded more than 2,000 calls related to fertilizer exposure. Prevention is really key to avoiding accidental exposure, but if you suspect your pet has ingested something lawn-side, please contact your veterinarian or the Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435.

Original Page that above information came from   ASPCA

Top 10 Pet Poisons of 2008

Is your pooch cuckoo for chocolate? Does your kitty like deep conditioning treatments? Sadly, not everything we love is good for us. In fact, many common household goods that we take for granted as harmless can be disastrous for our furry friends. In 2008, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center in Urbana, IL, handled more than 140,000 cases of pets exposed to toxic household substances, including insecticides, cleaning and beauty supplies and prescription medications.

To help you prevent an unhappy accident in 2009, our experts have created a list of the top 10 poisons that affected our pets last year. Here’s a sneak peek at their advice:

  • Top dishonors go to human medications, which accounted for approximately 50,000 calls to the Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline in 2008. Pets often snatch pill vials from counters and nightstands or gobble up meds accidentally dropped on the floor. “Keep all medications in a cabinet,” advises Dr. Helen Myers, veterinary toxicologist at the ASPCA. That includes pain remedies like ibuprofen and acetaminophen, as well as antidepressants and decongestants, which are all harmful to pets.
  • Our efforts to battle home invaders—like bugs and mice—resulted in nearly 39,000 cases of pets exposed to insecticides and rodent bait. Be sure to place toxic rodenticides out of reach of curious canines who might be attracted to their smell. The misuse of flea and tick products can also cause serious problems for cats. Avoid using any treatments not specifically intended for your pet.
  • Some of the most delicious people food—including citrus, avocado and raisins—can be poisonous to pets. Last year, the ASPCA fielded more than 13,500 calls of pets exposed to various foods. Chocolate ingestion accounted for nearly half of those cases, so be sure to keep the cocoa hidden from your resourceful cat or dog.
  • Household plants may keep your house green and your air clean, but some can cause serious gastrointestinal problems for companion animals who nibble on their stems and stalks. In 2008, plants accounted for more than 6,300 calls to the Animal Poison Control Center. Check out our toxic plant list before your next visit to the nursery.

As always, if you suspect your pet has ingested anything toxic, please call your vet or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435.




 
Featured Pet
Search

Ohio Puppy Rescue's Approved Shelter Award
OPR Canine Aware
Ohio Puppy Rescue's Dog Rescue and Relief Award 

OPR Recommended Training Facility is:
Ohio Canine Center
614-776-2222
Adam Abbot and Stephen Sharrock are graduates of National K9 School for dog trainers. They have years of experience working with all different breeds of dogs as well as managing the daycare grooming facilities. They are certified to train in the following areas: Basic Obedience; Advanced Obedience; Behavior Modification; Utility; Breed Identification; Puppy Development; Tracking; Scent Detection; Personal Protection; Police K-9; Soft Mouth Retrieval; and Assistance Dog Training. 

Tessa and Steve

Steve and Tess, an OPR Rescue

Support Us
Volunteer Match Logo
 201ms