Welcome to OPR
 

OPR Logo

                       Your Adoption Story
 Schnapps, now Sugar Bear                   

                   A Note from Sugar Bear

  Do you have a story and photo you would like to share about your  adopted pup or dog?  We're looking for some laughs, maybe some tears, how they have changed your life, how they have touched your heart.  We will post your photo on our home page and story to the Your Adoption Story page to share with all of our visitors.  Maybe, just maybe, you'll inspire someone to share their life with a homeless dog. Please send a photo and your story to: OhioPuppyRescue@aol.com  

                         

 Your Donations Help Support Our Community Projects

2013 was a year of great success and impact on the community through Ohio Puppy Rescue and Central Ohio Dog Rescue League efforts.   

*****Ohio Puppy Rescue Spay/Neuter Fund continues to focus primarily on our partnership with Pikes Friends, Pike Co. Humane Association, Shawnee Animal Hospital to provide free spay and neutering.  Our efforts have a "no questions asked" service to Pike and Scioto Counties for those who wish to have their dog altered.  The word has spread to several residents of these Counties who joined the efforts to stop unwanted dogs in their Counties.  In 2014, we will begin partnerships in Franklin County to provide free alters to pit bulls and black dogs, two of the types of the dogs euthanized at local shelters.

 *****We  request a "Pay It Forward" commitment from all who adopt a mill survivor.  This means that each person in the family promises to learn about puppy mills and tells at least one person about what they learned.

 *****We began a close relationship with Central Ohio Dog Rescue League and adopted the group as our sister organization under a DBA.  In 2013, we began joining talents and experiences to work with local organizations who focus on shutting down breeders who don't provide humane conditions and medical treatment to companion animals.   We also focused attention on rescuing pets no longer wanted by their families and dumped off at local shelters.

In order to continue our efforts in supporting our community, the rescue community, and the pet over population, additional funding is required. We need continuous and generous donations in order to sustain our life-changing work into 2014 and future years.  Please consider a donation to enable our work to continue.  Donations can be made by adopting one of our wonderful rescues, donate through your Community Giving programs at your workplace or directly by sending a monetary gift through
PayPal.  If you wish to send a check or money order, please contact us via email for details.

 

Kurt and Melissa

Puppy mill rescue, Kurt, and his Mom,  Melissa McCrady,
WTMJ-TV Anchor/Reporter

King Louie

Puppy mill rescue, King Louie, and his Mom,  

Jennifer Bates, NYCO Soprano



Donate to this organization through Drs. Foster and Smith
Drs. Foster and Smith: Dog Supplies - Cat Supplies - Pet Blog

 

Help Save Dogs From
Abandonment

Use the PetYourDog.com's dog matching
system
to find your compatible dog breeds
Ohio Puppy Rescue is a verified shelter of the petyourdog.com community and supports its awareness program

 


Pages of Interest
Bookmark and Share

 
Last Updated:
7/17/2014 5:32 PM

 

 

Pet Care

 Page One

 

Vet Visit

 

  • Examination (provide the stool sample)
  • Vaccination and Rabies shot
  • Ear drops
  • Fleas & ticks prevention
  • Heartworm prevention
  • Food
  • Microchip
  • Altering

 

Dog License in your local County

 

For Franklin County - https://doglicense.franklincountyohio.gov/dogs/dogsmenu

 

Dangerous Foods:

http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/protect_your_pet_from_common_household_dangers/foods_potentially_poisonous_to_pets.html

  • Chocolate/chocolate cookies
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Daffodils
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Chicken bones
  • Pear pips, the kernels of plums, peaches and apricots, apple core pips (contain cyanogenic glycosides resulting in cyanide poisoning)
  • Potato peelings and green looking potatoes
  • Rhubarb leaves
  • Moldy/spoiled foods
  • Alcohol
  • Yeast dough
  • Coffee grounds, beans & tea (caffeine)
  • Hops (used in home brewing)
  • Tomato leaves & stems (green parts)
  • Broccoli (in large amounts)
  • Cigarettes, tobacco, cigars
  • Xylitol (sweetener often found in sugar-free gum and candy)
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Apple seeds
  • Apricot pits
  • Cherry pits
  • Peach pits
  • Walnut
  • Raw/Undercooked Meat, Eggs and Bones
  • Junk food (that we are not suppose to eat too much)
  • Milk (caused diarrhea and other digestive upset)

 

Poisonous Plants

http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/protect_your_pet_from_common_household_dangers/common_poisonous_plants.html

 

Common plants: Daffodil, foxglove, bittersweet, day lily, delphinium, Easter lily, elderberry, English ivy, holly, hyacinth (bulbs), iris, lily of the valley, mistletoe, narcissus, oaks (shoots, leaves), poinsettia, potato, rhododendron, sago palm, wisteria, yew.

 

Dangerous household items:

http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/protect_your_pet_from_common_household_dangers/

 

  • Antifreeze
  • Cocoa mulch
  • Chemicals used on lawns and gardens, such as fertilizer and plant food
  • Cedar and other soft wood shavings
  • De-icing salts
  • Insect control products, such as the insecticides used in many over-the-counter flea and tick remedies,
  • Human medications such as pain killers (including aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen), cold medicines, anti-cancer drugs, anti-depressants, vitamins, and diet pills can all be toxic to animals.
  • Leftovers such as chicken bones easily shatter and can choke a cat or dog.
  • String, yarn, rubber bands, and even dental floss are easy to swallow and can cause intestinal blockages or strangulation.
  • Toys with removable parts

For more information about common household dangers, see The American Veterinary Medical Association's Pet Owner's Guide to Common Small Animal Poisons.

The HSUS recommends that pet owners use all household products with caution and keep a pet first-aid kit and manual readily available. The HSUS puts out a first-aid book in conjunction with the American Veterinary Medicine Association entitled Pet First Aid: Cats and Dogs. If all of your precautions fail, and you believe that your pet has been poisoned, contact your veterinarian or emergency veterinary service immediately. Signs of poisoning include listlessness, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle tremors, lack of coordination, and fever.

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center operates a hotline 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 888-426-4435 for a fee of $45 per case. If you call, you should be prepared to provide the following information: the name of the poison your animal was exposed to, the amount and how long ago; the species, breed, age, sex, and weight of your pet; and the symptoms the animal is displaying. You'll also be asked to provide your name, address, phone number, and credit card information.

Bitter Apple (in most of the pet stores): a solution to spray on things that you don’t want a dog to chew. No harm to the puppy. When dog tries to chew shoes, furniture, or you, use a toy to switch his attention.

 

Other information can be found in the Websites listed in this document or on the Internet.




 
Featured Pet
Search

Ohio Puppy Rescue's Approved Shelter Award
OPR Canine Aware
Ohio Puppy Rescue's Dog Rescue and Relief Award 

OPR Recommended Training Facility is:
Ohio Canine Center
614-776-2222
Adam Abbot and Stephen Sharrock are graduates of National K9 School for dog trainers. They have years of experience working with all different breeds of dogs as well as managing the daycare grooming facilities. They are certified to train in the following areas: Basic Obedience; Advanced Obedience; Behavior Modification; Utility; Breed Identification; Puppy Development; Tracking; Scent Detection; Personal Protection; Police K-9; Soft Mouth Retrieval; and Assistance Dog Training. 

Tessa and Steve

Steve and Tess, an OPR Rescue

Support Us
Volunteer Match Logo
 193ms